Most common skin tumors

Skin tumor types

Basalioma

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer. Light-skinned people have the highest risk of developing basal cell carcinoma. It mainly affects older people who have been exposed to the sun for long years. Unfortunately, basal cell carcinomas are also increasingly occurring in younger patients due to changed leisure habits. In addition to permanent exposure to light, contact with arsenic (previously used in viticulture and for the treatment of psoriasis), immunosuppression in organ transplant recipients, radioactive radiation, radiation treatments and rare hereditary diseases can be. Basal cell carcinomas are malignant skin tumors that, through uninhibited growth, destroy adjacent structures and thus cause great damage. In contrast to black skin cancer, there is usually no risk of colonization. However, the malignancy of this tumor becomes particularly clear when it grows on the face and can, for example, endanger and destroy the eyes or nose.

 

The surgical removal of the tumor is the first point of therapy. This is carried out by us in accordance with the guidelines. All tumors are examined histologically (tissue). The operation is carried out twice on the face, in the case of recurrent tumors and problem areas.

 

In the case of inoperable tumors, radiation therapy may be the therapy of choice. We work together with an appropriate clinic.

Black skin cancer (melanoma)

Malignant melanoma, also known as black skin cancer, is a highly malignant (malignant) degeneration of the pigment cells (melanocytes) that is mainly caused by exposure to UV radiation. The tumor tends to spread metastases via the lymphatic and blood vessels early on and is therefore considered to be extremely dangerous.

 

With early diagnosis and treatment, the chances of recovery are good. Waiting, whether out of negligence or fear, worsens the outlook significantly.

 

The primary treatment of choice is surgical removal of the primary tumor. We do this in accordance with the guidelines. After the tissue examination, the further therapeutic procedure follows. For tumors over 1mm thick, the first draining lymph node (sentinel lymph node) must be examined. A special nuclear medical examination in combination with a high-resolution ultrasound examination is carried out to localize the lymph node. Then the surgical removal can take place.

If the tumor is advanced, a sentinel lymph node biopsy is also performed.

 

Depending on the stage, chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be carried out with us. A close follow-up check with examination of the skin organ, ultrasound, X-ray and CT examinations is urgently required.

Spindle cell or squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common skin cancer. Light-skinned people have the highest risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma. It mainly affects older people who have been exposed to the sun for long years. Unfortunately, squamous cell carcinomas are also increasingly occurring in younger patients due to changed leisure habits. In addition to permanent exposure to light, radioactive radiation, radiation treatments (light and X-ray radiation), chronic inflammation, immunosuppression and particularly pronounced scars can be causative factors in the development.

Squamous cell carcinomas are malignant skin tumors which, through uninhibited growth, destroy adjacent structures and thus cause great damage. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can usually be permanently and completely cured by early, complete surgical removal. Metastasis to lymph nodes and distant organs is rarely possible in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin and occurs especially in thicker, more advanced tumors.